Best employment sectors for the over-fifties | LISER

Best employment sectors for the over-fifties

In 2019, the sectors of real estate, of manufacturing, of construction and of transportation were the sectors employing the largest number of older workers in the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg.

Significant disparities between sectors

In 1994, the rate of workers aged 50 and over at work was 11%. At that time, the sectors with the fewest older workers were, among others, those in the accommodation and food service (5%) and finance and insurance (6%). In comparison, the sectors of public administration (18%) and education (16%) had the largest rate of workers aged 50 and over.

Contrasting rise in older workers according to sector

Between 1994 and 2019, the share of workers aged 50 and over has more than doubled in the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg. Nevertheless, this development is not shared across all sectors. While the share of older workers in the education sector was multiplied by 1.5, the share in the accommodation and food service activities, and finance sectors has quadrupled.

This indicator has been first calculated in 2012, which was the European year for active ageing and solidarity between generations. At this date, LISER has developed, at the request of and in collaboration with the Ministry for Labour, Employment and the social and solidarity Economy, a research program concerning older workers and active ageing in Luxembourg. The aim of this program was to contribute to the reflection of Ministry on a proposition of a new law with respect to age policy measures (still in discussion today - click here for more information) by providing tools for reflection on company policies with respect to the situation of older workers including unemployment or retirement in Luxembourg. This indicator shows the evolution of the share of older workers (50 years old and over) in companies by economic activity (naceRev2).

In 1994, 11% of the workers were 50 years old or over. Four economic activities in particular had a high share of older workers: public administration (18%), education (16%), manufacturing (15%) and transport/storage (14%). The share of older workers in the real estate activities sector (12%) was around the national mean in 1994. The “youngest” sector, with no more than 5% of older workers, was the accommodation and food service activities sector. In all other sectors, the share of older workers fluctuated between 6% and 10%.

In 2019, sectors of transport (29%) and manufacturing (30%) still represented the economic activities with the greatest share of older workers. Construction and real estate activities also show high shares of older workers in 2019 (30% and 31%, respectively). The economic activities of wholesale and retail trade (24%), finance and insurance (25%), and health and social work (26%) recorded a proportion of older workers close to the national mean in 2019 (i.e. 25%). Finally, with one fifth of their employees aged 50+, the sectors of information and communication and accommodation and food service are the youngest sectors in 2019.

Finally, the economic activities with the highest share of older workers in 1994 were not those which had witnessed the most important growth. For example, though the share of older workers in domestic employment has more than doubled in 25 years (11% to 25%), in the public administration sector it was multiplied by 1.5 over the same period. In contrast, the sectors with the lowest share of older workers in 1994 saw the strongest growth in 25 years: the share of older workers was multiplied by 4.1 in the accommodation and food service activities sector, and by 4.2 in the financial and insurance activities sector.

Considering these figures, the process of keeping older workers employed in the workforce does not currently affect all sectors in the same way. However, all firms should be aware of the challenges that stem from the ageing population in the labour market and the actions to take to allow older workers to stay longer in employment.

Field

People with a job in domestic employment in Luxembourg on the 31st of March of each year: including salaried workers ("statut unique") and the civil servants; excluding the unsalaried, unemployed and people not in domestic employment in Luxembourg.

*This field is quite different from the one used in the publication (cited below ) in which the indicator appears (domestic employment in the private sector). This is why some differences can occur in the results.

Source

IGSS data (march of each year), calculations LISER

In order to respect the protection of personal data, IGSS has used a specialized software to round numbers in order to insure additivity of the tables as much as possible. Real numbers are rounded up or down to the tens of units (but not necessarily to the closest ten) so as to reduce the risk of identification and disclosure.

Reading Guide

In the economic activity of « manufacturing », the share of older workers (50 years old and more) has risen from 15% to 30% between 1994 and 2019.

Publications in which the indicator appears
LEDUC Kristell
CEPS/INSTEAD, 2012, Vivre au Luxembourg 82, 2 p.
Publications related to the topic of the indicator
LEDUC Kristell
CEPS/INSTEAD, 2012, Vivre au Luxembourg 82, 2 p.
GENEVOIS Anne-Sophie, LEDUC Kristell
CEPS/INSTEAD, 2013, Les Cahiers du CEPS/INSTEAD n°2013-04, 20 p.
LEDUC Kristell
CEPS/INSTEAD, 2013, Les Cahiers du CEPS/INSTEAD n°2013-01, 16 p.
GENEVOIS Anne-Sophie
CEPS/INSTEAD, 2012, Vivre au Luxembourg n°85, 2 p.
HAURET Laetitia
CEPS/INSTEAD, 2013, Vivre au Luxembourg n°88, 2 p.
CLÉMENT Franz
CEPS/INSTEAD, 2012, Les Cahiers du CEPS/INSTEAD n°2012-06, 16 p.